Category Archives: Civility

Giveaways from Last Night’s Republican Primary Debate.

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If immediately after turning off your television you didn’t feel like you were being quick-talked into buying a borderline “quasi-legal,” investment package that sounds too good to be true because it relies upon unspoken yet overly optimistic and highly theoretical “growth” projections, then perhaps Marco Rubio’s assertion that we need “less” philosophers is telling. If that is indeed the case, I also have some stock in Accu.so I’d like to sell.  And as much as I’d rather sit in a closed room with Donald Trump for an undetermined amount of time, listening to him list different synonyms for the word “worst” as they can be used to describe what and how specific people, events, and contracts, have been the worst things in “history,” I have to give Fox moderator, Maria Bartiromo, credit for pressing Ted Cruz about his tax plan. Continue reading

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Lies and the Right-to-Work

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Right-to-work advocates allege that union contracts fundamentally infringe on workers’ rights and prerogatives. In response, R2W legislation would prevent any union from requiring employees to pay union dues as a condition of employment.

Were union contracts handed down by fiat from a tyrannical central authority then these bills would be landmark achievements in securing personal liberty. The simple fact though is that there is no free market being preserved here, only the perverse and unsustainable fantasy of the stock broker who charges no fees.

More from AccuSo staff writer, editor, and para-laureate Will Parke, on the dishonest agenda of the right-to-work movement and how it endangers a truly free market, at Rebel News.

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Journalism as Activism

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[P]ersonalized delivery of modern media has provoked criticism of ideological journalism. Media watchdog groups like FAIR, Media Matters, or Accuracy in Media – themselves staking out ideological positions – were formed to confront misleading and counterfactual claims by biased news organizations. However, the standard plea for an ideologically objective journalism is fundamentally and absolutely flawed […] Feigned neutrality fundamentally misconstrues the purpose of journalism: journalism is a form of activism.

Staff analyst, ne’er do well, and busybody Wm. Parke on the nature and necessity of advocacy journalism, at Rebel News.

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A Liar or a Bungler Walk into GOP Headquarters, Who Should Resign First?

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Remember that kid you or someone close to you hung out with in and possibly shortly after high school that always had nice things–cars, bikes, clothes, etc?  The kid probably always insisted that he/she paid for these things with their own, earned money yet barely if ever worked some shitty job.  Furthermore, it was an obvious, open-secret among you and all your friends that their relatively well-off, above-middle-class parents were bankrolling their expensive tastes?

Apparently those kids grow up to run for public office.  As it turns out, bankrolling your kids’ expensive habits, although frowned upon by anyone with a functioning work-ethic, is actually legal until little Frankie develops a taste for public power and needs money for campaigning.  As it turns out, hitting up mom and dad for a brand new Dodge Charger complete with a special edition sport-package is one thing; doing so for money during a campaign for public office is illegal.

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But Divided They’ll Fall

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There’s a problem with unions in America. They make the market work too well.

I’ve got a trite rule of thumb for when a politician speaks: Assume the opposite and work back to the truth from there. It’ll save you time. So when the hacks from AFP or the various other Right to Work lobbyists start saying that union contracts are anti-free market I’m not surprised to find they’re almost exactly wrong. Continue reading

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Constructivist Theory of American Federalism: Propositional Weaknesses in the Idea of Self-Governance, Then and Now

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American federalism faces as many (if not more) challenges today as it did during the time of the founding. Certain critical topics, such as national security, are easily identifiable through study of the discursive practices surrounding American federalism. Others, while not directly (some might say explicitly) addressed during the Constitutional debates, still require detailed attention filtered though a lens sensitive to American federalism concerns—such as environmental protection and disaster relief. There are no easy solutions to any of these issues; thus, reliance on any a priori ideological formulas for action will certainly exacerbate the problems and frustrate both the American public and its government agencies, at all levels. This natural outgrowth of partisan-political discourse places party interest above that of the public and surely endangers the welfare of American citizens, jeopardizing the fruits of their labor, fueling mistrust in American political institutions, and compromising the integrity of the American republic anytime an unforeseen circumstance materializes.

∞Confusion thus ensues∞

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Say What(?)…Say When…Say Uncle…When Fear is Sovereign: Torture as the End of Liberal Regimes…?

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What is most revealing about torture?  The truth—according to some theories.

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Scientific Jouissance and What Lies Beneath the “Pleasure Principle”

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“An ego thus educated has become ‘reasonable’; it no longer lets itself be governed by the pleasure principle, but obeys the reality principle, which also, at bottom, seeks to obtain pleasure, but pleasure which is assured through taking account of reality, even though it is pleasure postponed and diminished”

Freud.

The cover of the March issue of National Geographic Magazine suggests that there is a “War on Science.”  The title of the feature article asks “Why Do Many Reasonable Doubt Science?”   I think the question should ask “why do so many unreasonable people doubt science.”  Or what makes them believe they are even capable of the task. When reasonable people “doubt science” we don’t ask why(?).  We call it the peer-review process, the healthy habit of scientific skepticism whereby scientists’ findings are meticulously put through the tests of rigor, of falsifiability and verification through reproducible results.

Indeed, in the article it is suggested that scientists even find a kind of professional pleasure in skepticism, in pointing out to their colleagues where their  studies may have faltered.  On the topic of “pleasure” Freud was one of the most famous to theorize that people (yes, even scientists) instinctually seek biological (material) and psychological (social.professional) pleasure and avoid pain therein.  Thus it’s not unreasonable, in a Freudian sense, for scientists to find pleasure in their professional, critical role; some might argue that its even a crucial part of the “success” of science.

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We Can’t Be Silent, ‘Cause They Might Be Giants

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It’s easy to get into a rut bagging on Republicans. Let’s face it, they go out of their way to look like a sack of stewed assholes. So let’s just take a quick minute here to remind ourselves of something important: the President’s a fucking liar. Continue reading

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Unit Shifter

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Hillary Clinton’s gonna run for President.

I’d just say Hillary Clinton’s gonna be President but the Republicans haven’t even really teased their lineup for 2016 yet and I feel like I’m gonna jinx a good showing if I say too much right now. Can’t write them off entirely yet, gotta give ’em time to feel things out. Let ’em show a little leg.

Reread that sentence, but keep an image of Ted Cruz in your mind. Yeah. Continue reading

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